Growing marijuana and selling your home

Mortgage Tips DAZADA DIAMOND 31 Oct

Growing marijuana and selling your home

There is quite a bit of information being passed around about growing marijuana in your home that could or will  prevent the sale of your property down the road.

CMHC is Canada’s federally owned mortgage insurer. As of October 25, 2018, their stance on homes that were former grow operations has not changed and reads as follows:

“At this time, CMHC is not making any changes to its mortgage loan insurance policies in relation to the impending  legalization of cannabis. CMHC will continue to insure mortgage loans for homeowner residential properties (1-4 units) and multi-unit residential properties (5+ units) where cannabis was previously grown and/or will be legally grown.
We will also monitor the impacts of the Cannabis Act on our mortgage loan insurance activities over the long term. We will also be reminding Approved Lenders that, in cases where property damage has occurred, they are required to disclose this information to CMHC in making the request for mortgage loan insurance and confirm that remedial action has been taken to address any related property damage/alterations,” Courtesy Beverly LePage, Client Relations – CMHC.

HOWEVER, in my opinion as a mortgage broker, it is the damage to the home from a “typical illegal” grow op that is most important here. When one hears “grow op”, you picture rooms full of plants with lights and irrigation lines with no care taken to prevent irreparable damage to the home.

Please consider the following scenarios.

Tomato Enthusiast #1
Tomato enthusiast #1 absolutely loves tomatoes. He/she finds them relaxing and even fun to share with friends. Tomato  enthusiast #1 places dozens of tomato plants in every room of their home with full irrigation and grow lighting. Without proper ventilation, this caused a drastic increase in humidity in the home. If that were to continue,  a dangerous mold condition may develop, making the home uninhabitable. In this case the damage that
Tomato enthusiast #1 caused may prevent a mortgage from being placed on the property by the lender and/or insurer.

Tomato Enthusiast #2
Tomato enthusiast #2 also loves his tomatoes but not quite as much as #1. He/she enjoys having a few slices on toast on a Friday evening as a weekly treat. Tomato enthusiast #2 places 4 tomato plants in front of the living room window and daily watered and talked to them pleasantly. Having 4 tomatoes plants in the home was not illegal before October 17th and probably never will be. With proper care the 4 tomato plants thrived and never caused any damage to the home. A few weeks down the road Tomato enthusiast #2 decided to sell the property.  When their trusted realtor arrived to list the home there was no apparent damage caused by any plant or animal
that resided there and it was immaculate. It is highly unlikely that the presence of 4 tomato plants would prevent approval by a mortgage lender or insurer.

If you have any questions, contact a Dominion Lending Centres Mortgage Professional near you.

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/growing-marijuana-and-selling-your-home/

Canadians are second biggest homebuyers in Florida

Latest News & Economy DAZADA DIAMOND 30 Oct

Canadians are second biggest homebuyers in Florida

Canadians are second biggest homebuyers in FloridaCanadians made up 22% of all foreign buyers of Florida homes in 2018, outpacing Europeans (19%) and Asians (11%).

However, buyers from the Caribbean and Latin America made up the largest share (36%) according to data from Florida Realtors.

Most foreign buyers paid all-cash (67%) and 71% bought for vacation, residential rental, or both.

For snowbirds hoping to buy in Florida, competition has been intensifying as tight inventory and low mortgage rates have increased demand for homes.

Across all foreign buyers, 53% preferred townhouses or condos while 43% purchased a detached single-family home, 3% purchased residential land and another 3% purchased other types of properties.

Nearly half of foreign buyers purchased in a suburban or small town/rural area and 93% visited Florida at least once before purchasing a property.

For the 12 months ahead just 34% of Florida Realtors said they expected to work with international buyers, down from 37% in 2017; perhaps reflective of the tight market and interest from domestic buyers.

  • https://www.mortgagebrokernews.ca/market-update/canadians-are-second-biggest-homebuyers-in-florida-249958.aspx

4 Key Things You Need To Know About A Second Mortgage

Mortgage Tips DAZADA DIAMOND 30 Oct

4 Key Things You Need To Know About A Second Mortgage

Many homeowners are vaguely aware of the fact that you can take out a second loan on your home. You hear your friends mention it or perhaps a family member close to you has gone through the process—but do you truly know what it means to take out a second mortgage? We have taken all the questions we get asked about second mortgages and compiled it into four key points.

A SECOND MORTGAGE IS BASED ON THE EQUITY IN YOUR HOME
The total loan amount that the second mortgage lender will offer you will depend on the equity that has been built up in your home. Second mortgages allow you to access up to 95% of the equity you have in your property. For instance:

House Value $850,000
95% LTV (maximum mortgage amount) $807,500.00
First Mortgage $550,000.00
Amount Available Through Second $257,500.00

INTEREST RATES WILL VARY AND BE HIGHER THAN YOUR FIRST MORTGAGE
This is because when a lender agrees to a second mortgage, they are taking a higher risk as he gets second priority in case of default. With that being said, we have options and solutions such as working with private lenders that can help you obtain a reduced rate and the right product for your mortgage situation. Typically, you can expect an interest rate of 6.95%-19.95% with lender and broker fees included.

YOUR PAYMENT CAN BE AS LOW AS INTEREST ONLY PAYMENTS
One of the advantages of selecting to use a second mortgage is the fact that the payments are attractive. You can pay interest only payments or you can also select to pay the interest plus the principle loan amount. You can work with your mortgage broker to discuss options and what would work best with your situation.

THERE ARE ADDITIONAL FEES TO CONSIDER
Since we want to have you understand ALL the fees associated, it is important to know that setting up a second mortgage will require you to pay: *note dollar amounts are approximations

An appraisal fee to assess the value of your home: $300
Legal fees to set it up: $2,000
Lenders & Broker fees: 1-5%

Second mortgages are a great option for many and may be a better solution than a refinance or a Home Equity Loan (HELOC). If you are interested in learning more or want to find out if a second mortgage is right for you, talk to your Dominion Lending Centres mortgage broker. We can guarantee they can guide you the process from start to finish!

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/4-key-things-you-need-to-know-about-a-second-mortgage/

Demand Loan vs. Term Loan. What’s the Difference?

General DAZADA DIAMOND 29 Oct

Demand Loan vs. Term Loan. What’s the Difference?

What’s the difference between a Demand Loan and a Term Loan? A recent commercial mortgage refinancing I was involved with resulted in a discussion around Demand Loans. What are they exactly, and how they might typically differ from a term loan?

A demand loan is a loan that a lender can require to be repaid in full at any time. This condition is understood by the lender and the borrower (or should be) from the outset. A term loan on the other hand is a loan which has a specific length of term. It has a set repayment schedule.

Normal loan default remedies are provided to the Lender in typical term loan documentation. Unless and until there is a default, the borrower generally continues making regular (often monthly) payments. Apart from having to typically report annually with updated rent rolls or financial statements, has little contact with the lender until loan maturity.

Robert D. Betteridge, a lawyer with Burnet, Duckworth & Palmer LLP, in a May 2008 article entitled Does Demand Always Mean Demand? indicated that in simple terms a Demand loan often has all its required terms in a few paragraphs. “The debt is acknowledged, an interest rate and payment mechanism is specified and a clear statement that the loan is payable on demand is included.” He goes on to state that “term loan documentation is necessarily more complex”. Of necessity the lender will typically need to cause repayment of the debt if certain elements of default occur, often a monetary (i.e. non-payment) event.

Increasingly however, Lenders are using hybrid loan documentation which seems to include both elements of Demand and Term loans. These hybrid loans may in fact be Demand loans in the sense that they provide the Lender “a right to demand repayment upon the occurrence of a specified event of default”.

Do Lenders really call loans?
A relatively sophisticated borrower I represented last year, secured an attractive rate from a Bank lender. However, the product was only offered as a Demand Loan. This borrower successfully negotiated a further provision. The lender’s security documentation was amended, to require the lender to specifically identify the item of default, and to set out a 10 day Notice period to cure the default, prior to being able to call the loan (i.e. Demand payment).

Was it necessary for this borrower to amend the loan security? This borrower, out of an abundance of caution, felt that it was. I have often thought it prudent to consider a commercial mortgage as a loan with a demand element. The practical reality is that many/most commercial mortgages include a borrower covenant to pay as well as security for the debt. The covenant to pay typically includes language which sets out that if default occurs, all mortgage money then owing to the lender will, if the lender so chooses, become due and payable.

My experience has been that Demand is a lever that Banks or other lenders could use if they feel that there overall investment is at risk. Its more likely to happen if the borrower’s financial situation is precarious, or if the loan security is in jeopardy. A well leased commercial real estate project provides excellent security for a lender. Lenders in these situations most often supplement their security with an Assignment of Rents to further protect themselves. This allows them to step into the shoes of the borrower/landlord, during a mortgage enforcement action, to secure rents directly from property tenants, to continue to service the mortgage payments.

What’s the take-away here?
In practical terms, if you make your monthly mortgage payments as agreed, your loan will likely not be “demanded” or “called”. It is important to understand that it’s the lender’s prerogative. Other factors come in to play of course. Consider the rate of interest. If your loan carries a rate of 6%, and market rates have fallen to 4%, your lender is not likely to call your loan anytime soon, unless they perceive undue risk. They cannot readily replace the loan they call, with a new investment opportunity paying the same rate.

Bear in mind your loan documentation may reflect a Demand/Term hybrid loan. If unclear, speak to your lawyer to understand under what specific circumstances, your loan is callable.

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/demand-loan-vs-term-loan-whats-the-difference/

Tips for Buying Your First Home

Down Payment & Buying DAZADA DIAMOND 26 Oct

Tips for Buying Your First Home

As a licensed Mortgage Broker, I am often asked “what do I need to know when buying my first home?”
Everyone has their own aims and objects when buying their first home. As a Mortgage Broker, I specialize in making sure your financing is in order to facilitate your dreams of owning a home.

Buying your first home is very exciting, but it can easily be overwhelming. Being prepared is the first step. The decision to purchase your first home can be a huge, life-changing event and you need to know exactly what you are getting into.

To get you prepared with the knowledge you need, here are my 7 tips to consider when you buy your first home: (Some of these may only relate to B.C.)

1. Strengthen your credit rating.

It’s pretty simple: the higher your credit score, the lower your mortgage rate will be.

Spend the time now to improve your credit. Check your credit report. Many credit reports have errors, so you need to ensure that your credit bureau is current and correct.

ALWAYS pay every single one of your bills on time. Set up automatic payments if you have had any late payments over the last couple of years.

Stop applying for any new credit a year before you are considering buying and continue until you sign the closing papers on your home. Spend only 30% of credit limits on credit cards.

2. Find a Mortgage Broker and figure out how much you can afford to spend.

The home buyer’s mantra: Get a home that’s financially comfortable.

Contact a Dominion Lending Centres Mortgage Professional. We work with you up to a year in advance to analyze your situation, and tell you how much mortgage and monthly payments you can afford.

Lenders like to see that you spend a maximum:

  1. 32-39% of your Gross income on mortgage payments, maintenance fees (if applicable), heat & property taxes
  2. 38-44% of your Gross Income on all debts
    Including #1 above PLUS loans, credit cards, additional financing etc.

1 year+ prior to going home shopping, calculate the mortgage payment for the home in your intended price range, along with the increased expenses (such as taxes, insurance and utilities). Then bank the difference between the home payments and what you’re paying now. Not only will that simulate ownership, it also helps you save for your down payment!

When you are ready to start shopping for your home, as your Mortgage Broker, I gather all your financial documentation that the lender requires, in order to figure out much you can afford to spend. Then I work with you to get a pre-approval and lock in a low interest rate to protect you in case rates rise between now and the time you by your new home.

3. How long will you live in your new home?

The transaction costs of buying and selling a house are substantial including: real estate fees, legal fees, Property Transfer Tax, selling in a down market, moving, etc.

If you don’t plan to live in your new home for at least 3-5 years, you may not gain enough equity to make selling worthwhile.

Short-term home ownership can be a pretty expensive proposition. If that is the case, holding off on purchasing could be your best option.

4. How much house you need?

Buying a cheaper, smaller home might sound like a good place to start, but could end up costing you more if you need to move due to changes in your lifestyle, including a growing family. Then again, buying more house than you currently need will cost you more with higher mortgage payments, higher maintenance, energy and tax costs.

Prioritize your housing wish list. They say that the 3 most important things to think about when buying are home are location, location, location. In Greater Vancouver your first choice for location i.e. Kitsilano or Yaletown may not be within your means. You also need to think about how the new home space will be used and whether it will fit your lifestyle now and in the future.

5. Build a savings account.

Start now to build a healthy savings account. To avoid paying CMHC Mortgage Default Insurance you need to prove you have a 20% down payment.

Building your savings account, over and above the money you will require for the down payment and closing costs. Lenders want to see that you’re not living paycheck to paycheck. If you have three to five months’ worth of mortgage payments in your savings, that makes you a much better loan candidate.

6. Remember closing costs.

While you’re saving your down payment, you need to save for closing costs too. They’re typically 1% to 3% of the purchase price and due on the completion date.

In B.C. you need to also pay Property Transfer Tax (PPT). The amount of tax you pay is based on the fair market value of the land and improvements (e.g. buildings) on the date of registration unless you purchase a pre-sold strata unit. The tax is charged at a rate of 1% for the first $200,000 and 2% for the portion of the fair market value that is greater than $200,000. 3% on the portion over $2,000,000 and if the property is residential, a further 2% on the portion greater than $3,000,000

7. Shop for a Realtor that has your best interests in mind.

Interview at least three Realtors. Get referrals from people you trust who have recently bought or sold, including me, your mortgage broker. I work with a lot of realtors, some of whom are outstanding in their field. Once you’ve decided which Realtor is the best fit for you, they can help you focus your search to find your perfect home. There is no cost for the Realtor for the home buyer since the home seller pays the commission.

Besides the 7 tips I’ve listed above, there are many other things you should need to be aware of prior to buying your first home.

Mortgages are complicated… BUT they don’t have to be! Engage an expert!

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/7-tips-for-buying-your-first-home/

Rates On The Rise Both Variable & Fixed

Banks & Bank of Canada DAZADA DIAMOND 25 Oct

Rates On The Rise Both Variable & Fixed

With the Bank of Canada in a mood to raise rates, it’s a similar feeling for the bond market, which impacts fixed rates. In every interest-rate market there are many factors leading to an increase and we are hoping to provide a little bit of clarity on what is happening and what it means to you and your loved ones. We tell you this in advance to be proactive to take care of you, as our mortgage family, so as you hear the news about the changes you have comfort we are here to lead with clarity.

At this time, we see fixed rates increasing as the bond market increases.

Why do we note this information and how does it relate to you?

If you are in a variable rate, you will want to:

  1. Review your lock-in options by contacting us or your lender directly (every lender has different policies in allowing us to help or not). Knowing it’s unlikely the prime rate will reduce and fixed rates are on the rise, there could be a sweet spot to review your options now.
  2. If you decide not to lock in, it’s time to review your discount to see if a higher one can be obtained elsewhere.

Locking in won’t be for everyone, especially if you are making higher payments and your mortgage is below $300,000, which most people fit and will continue on that path. Also if your discount is more than .6 below prime you may want to wait and watch the market. Locking in will be around a 1% higher rate than you are likely presently paying. If knowing you can likely lock in around 4% now is most attractive to you, this may be your time.

If you are in a fixed rate:

  1. If you obtained your mortgage in the last year, stay put.
  2.  If you are looking to move up the property ladder or consolidate debt, get your application in to us ASAP so we can hold options for up to 120 days.
  3. If you are up for renewal this year or know someone who is, secure your options now with us to weight out the savings prior to renewal with us keeping a watchful eye on the market.

Keep in mind that if you or someone you care about has an average mortgage of $350,000 and got it a few years ago at 2.49% now a qualified applicant can expect about 3.89% which is a payment increase of $254 dollars a month, so increasing your payment now will protect your equity, and you from future payment shock.

Please reach out to a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional so we can help ensure you or a loved is on the right path in our ever changing market.

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/rates-on-the-rise-both-variable-fixed/

Are you behind on your CRA Taxes?

General DAZADA DIAMOND 24 Oct

Are you behind on your CRA Taxes?

Nothing weighs heavy on one’s shoulders than owning a home and getting behind on your Canada Revenue taxes. Most banks will not be able to help you refinance your home to pay them off as CRA has first dibs on your house and assets. We have clients owing anywhere from $5,000- $300,000 in back taxes and have threatening letters from CRA that would keep anyone up at night.

There are options and strategies we can assist with financing your CRA debts:

1: We use alternative lenders that charge higher fees/rates for a 1-year term

2: Short term 2nd mortgage to pay off your CRA debts and then refinance back with your lender.

Find out who we can help with a no-obligation application. Let a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional get you back on track!

Some CRA notes on penalties for filing late:

The first time you file late you’ll pay:

  • a late-filing penalty –5% of the amount of tax you owe, plus 1% for every month that your return is late, for up to 12 months. That adds up to a maximum of 17% of the tax you owe.
  • interest – at the prescribed interest rate on the amount you owe, beginning on May 1. You’ll also be charged interest on any late-filing penalties. Interest is compounded daily, not monthly or annually. The prescribed interest rate can change every 3 months.
  • If you miss the deadline again, the late-filing penalties are doubled. For example, if the CRA charged you late-filing penalties for any of the 3 previous years, you would pay a penalty of up to 50% made up of 10% of the taxes you owe, plus 2% of the taxes you owe for each full month that your return is late, to a maximum of 20 months.

 

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/are-you-behind-on-your-cra-taxes/

1 in 3 fear rate rises could move them towards bankruptcy

Latest News & Economy DAZADA DIAMOND 23 Oct

1 in 3 fear rate rises could move them towards bankruptcy

1 in 3 fear rate rises could move them towards bankruptcyWith the Bank of Canada widely expected to increase interest rates Wednesday, a poll from debt advisors MNP shows rising concern over higher rates.

The survey, conducted by Ipsos, found that 1 in 3 Canadians are worried that rising interest rates could push them towards bankruptcy, up 6% since June.

More than half (52%) of respondents said that they are concerned about affording their debts as rates climb, that’s up 3% since June.

The share of those who say they are feeling the effects or recent rate rises; and the share who say future rises could put them in financial trouble; both hit 45%.

Almost two thirds of both Millennial and Gen X respondents are concerned about the impact of interest rate rises on their ability to service debts, while Boomers are less concerned (40%).

The poll reveals that 80% will cut back on spending to counter the effects of rising rates and there is some optimism about debt situations with 28% saying theirs has improved in the past year, 39% expecting improvement in the next year, and 50% saying improvement will be within 5 years.

Two in five said they regret the level of debt they have.

Albertans (20%) are most likely to say their current debt situation is worse, followed by residents of Atlantic Canada (17%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (15%), Ontario (13%), Quebec (10%), and British Columbia (8%).

Quebec residents (49%) are most likely to rate their personal debt situation as good, followed by residents British Columbia (45%), Ontario (38%), Saskatchewan and Manitoba (34%), Alberta (33%) and Atlantic Canada (28%).

  • https://www.mortgagebrokernews.ca/market-update/1-in-3-fear-rate-rises-could-move-them-towards-bankruptcy-249674.aspx

7 things every self-employed individual should know — Before you apply for a mortgage

Commercial & Rental DAZADA DIAMOND 23 Oct

7 things every self-employed individual should know — Before you apply for a mortgage

Self-employed individuals are quickly becoming one of the most common clients that we handle. Daily we have successful business owners come into our offices who enjoy the perks of being an entrepreneur. One of these includes fantastic write-offs that allow them to bring their income down to a low tax bracket.

However, this benefit can also mean that the same business owner may have a hard time qualifying for a mortgage all because their income is significantly reduced on paper… how frustrating ‘eh? But these savvy business owners know that there is advanced planning that is involved in being able to qualify for conventional financing. Back in 2015, Statistics Canada reported that there were about 2.7 million people self-employed in Canada… which is an astounding 14% of the total population of Canada! What does that stat mean? Two things:

1. That being self-employed is a more than viable way of earning income in today’s world.
2. That 14% may not fit into the conventional lending “box”

The Conventional Lending Box
To fit into this box, self-employed individuals must meet certain qualifications. For example, they must be able to provide:
>Two most recent years of personal tax returns
>Two most current years Notice of Assessments
>Two most current years financial statements
>Statement of Bank Account Activity
>Investment Income Statement
>Photo ID

Now, the one area that raises a red flag in the above is the tax returns. As we previously mentioned, their income claimed on the return itself might be significantly different than their actual income. Tax deductions related to business often reflect meals, rental spaces, credit card interest etc. The result is that the income the self-employed business owner shows on their tax return is a significantly lower figure than what their actual take home pay is. However, the conventional lending box requires income to justify the mortgage. So how do we pull this off?

The Unconventional Lending Box
Now please keep in mind that “unconventional” in this box just means that as a self-employed individua,l you are going to work with a Mortgage Broker to find an alternative to allow you to show that you can justify the mortgage. There are several well-known and consistently used pieces of advice that we would like to pass along to you:

1. If you are organized and planning (think 2 years out) you can plan to write off fewer expenses in the two years leading up to the property purchase. Yes, you will pay more personal taxes. However, your income will be higher, and it will be easier to qualify you for the mortgage amount you are seeking.
2. Set up your finances through a certified accountant. Many lenders want to see self-employed income submitted through a professional rather than doing it yourself. The truth is that the time you spend doing your own taxes will not be nearly as efficient both financially and time-wise as a professional. Make sure that you discuss with them what your goals are so that they can set up your taxes properly for you!
3. Choose your timing carefully. If you are leaving for an extended holiday within the two years before purchasing, your two-year average income may fluctuate. Plan your vacations and extended trips away with income in mind.
4. Consider using Stated Income. You have the option to state your income. This is based on you being in the same profession for 2+ years before being self-employed. The lender looks at the industry and researches the mean income of someone in that profession and with your experience. You will be required to provide additional documents such as bank statements, showing consistent deposits and other documentation may be asked of you to show your income.
5. Avoid Bankruptcy at all cost…. or if you do declare bankruptcy have all your discharge papers on hand to present to the lender and ensure you have two years of re-established your credit.
6. Mortgage Brokers can state income with lenders at the best discounted rates. But if you do not qualify with A lenders using stated income, then a broker will work with you to utilize a B Lender who are more lenient but may come with higher interest rates and applicable lending and broker fees.
7. Last but not least, if A or B lenders don’t fit, private financing can be looked at as an alternative option in order to get you into the market and offer a short-term solution to improve credit or top up your reporting income. Then you and your broker can refinance into an A or B lender at that time. Just keep in mind that private lending will have a higher rate associated with it , with lender and broker fees added on as well, if you choose to go with this option.

So, to all of our self-employed, hard-working, determined individuals, take heart! You can qualify for the mortgage you want, it just takes a little more planning to get everything in order. Keep in mind to that every lender has different guidelines as to how they view self-employment. Working with a Dominion Lending Centres broker leading up to your property purchase can help you ensure you get the mortgage you want.

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/7-things-every-self-employed-individual-should-know-before-you-apply-for-a-mortgage/

CMHC Changes to Assist Self-Employed Borrowers

Latest News & Economy DAZADA DIAMOND 22 Oct

CMHC Changes to Assist Self-Employed Borrowers

As a self-employed person myself, I was happy to hear that CMHC is willing to make some changes that will make it easier for us to qualify for a mortgage.
In an announcement on July 19, 2018, the CMHC has said “Self-employed Canadians represent a significant part of the Canadian workforce. These policy changes respond to that reality by making it easier for self-employed borrowers to obtain CMHC mortgage loan insurance and benefit from competitive interest rates.” — Romy Bowers, Chief Commercial Officer, Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation. These policy changes are to take effect Oct. 1, 2018.

Traditionally self-employed borrowers will write as many expenses as they can to minimize the income tax they pay each year. While this is a good tax-saving technique it means that often a realistic annual income can not be established high enough to meet mortgage qualification guidelines.
Plain speak, we don’t look good on paper.

Normally CMHC wants to see two years established business history to be able to determine an average income. But the agency said it will now make allowances for people who acquire existing businesses, can demonstrate sufficient cash reserves, who will be expecting predictable earnings and have previous training and education.
Take for example a borrower that has been an interior designer with a firm for the past eight years and in the same industry for the past 30 years, but just struck out on his own last year. His main work contract is with the firm he used to work for, but now he has the ability to pick up additional contracts from the industry in which he has vast connections.
Where previously he would have had to entertain a mortgage with an interest rate at least 1% higher than the best on the market and have to pay a fee, now he would be able to meet insurance requirements and get preferred rates.

The other change that CMHC has made is to allow for more flexible documentation of income and the ability to look at Statements of Business Professional Activity from a sole-proprietor’s income tax submission to support Add Backs of certain write-offs to support a grossing-up of income. Basically, recognizing that many write-offs are simply for tax-saving purposes and are not a reduction of actual income. This could mean a significant increase in income and buying power.

It is refreshing after years of government claw-backs and conservative policy changes to finally see the swing back in the other direction. Self-employed Canadians have taken on the burden of an often fluctuating income and responsible income tax management all for the ability to work for themselves. These measures will help them with the reward of being able to own their own home as well.

  • https://dominionlending.ca/news/cmhc-changes-to-assist-self-employed-borrowers/
123